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  • Amy Lippert, NTP

Breakfast Sourdough Bread

Updated: May 2


When Scott and I were first married we lived in a small, sleepy little beach town called Fernandina Beach, just north of Jacksonville, Florida. One of my fondest memories was this adorable café we had found that had the best fruit and nut bread ever! After we moved away from Fernie B in 2005, I have been dreaming of that sweet, nutty, delicious bread ever since...and with this recipe, my dreams became reality! I know you will just fall in love with this sweet and savory breakfast bread like I have.



Breakfast Bread

Loaded with sweet dried fruits, bitter walnuts, and nutritious whole wheat flour, is my favorite breakfast bread ever! This easy and nutritious wheat bread sourdough will become a family staple in no time! Simple and customizable, feel free to substitute out any of the dried fruits for the ones you love and the same goes for the nuts and seeds!



 

Why Sourdough is So Good for You!


Have you ever wondered why sourdough is considered a healthier bread? There are several reasons why sourdough is a great choice when looking for a tasty and nutrient dense bread. Sourdough bread is rich in fiber, minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and potassium, vitamins B1 (thiamine), B3 (niacin), B5 (riboflavin) and B9 (folate).


Sourdough bread can be easier to digest for those with gluten sensitivities. I do NOT recommend eating sourdough bread if you have celiacs disease or any type of severe sensitivity to gluten without checking with your physician first. One of the reasons sourdough can be more digestible for those with gluten sensitivities is due to the long fermentation process that sourdough bread undergoes. This allows for the wild yeast and bacteria present from your starter to break down proteins and carbohydrates (fructans) found in the flour [1].


Sourdough bread can be helpful for individuals working to maintain more stable blood sugar levels as it has a lower glycemic index, which supports healthier blood sugar regulation by reducing the potential for a severe blood glucose spike due to its slower absorption. This is thought to occur due to the fermentation process and how the carbohydrates are broken down and changed [2].


So grab your starter and let's get baking!


Fruit and Nut Sourdough Bread

 

Breakfast Sourdough Ingredients

Serves 10-12


For the Leaven:

35g starter

75 g water. About 1/3 of a cup

75 g flour. About 1/2 of a cup

For the Bread:

125g Prepared Leaven

200g Organic Einkorn Whole Wheat Flour

350g + 1/4-1/2 cup for kneading Unbleached Organic Bread Flour

350 g Cool Filtered Water

5g Fine Sea Salt

1/2 cup Unsweetened Organic Raisins

1/2 cup Unsweetened Dried Cherries or Unsweetened Cranberries

1/2 cup Chopped Unsweetened Dried Turkish Apricots

1/4 cup Chopped Raw Walnuts

1/4 cup Raw Pumpkins Seeds or Pepitas

How to Make Breakfast Sourdough


Two Nights Before


1. Make the leaven: In a small bowl, add 35 grams of your starter (an older starter will yield a more sour loaf.)


2. Add the water and flour and mix well with a spatula.


3. Cover and set aside overnight.


Sourdough Starter
Fresh mixed leaven


Sourdough Bread
Leaven after 12-hours

Working Day


1. In a large bowl combine 100g of leaven and 350g of water, gently stir to combine.


2. Add einkorn wheat flour only and whisk or mix well with a spatula (this prevents it from clumping together.)


3. Add the bread flour and mix well with a wooden spoon or spatula until it begins to come together. Using a clean hand, gently knead the dough in the bowl for a few minutes until all the flour is incorporated.


4. Cover and let sit for 1-4 hours (first rise), until it has doubled in size.

  • Seasonal temperatures will effect the rise of the dough. During the warmer months the dough may rise faster than the winter months, so keep an eye on the dough.


Fruit Sourdough Bread
Dough just mixed together

Fruit and Nut Bread
After the first rise

5. After the first rise, turn dough onto clean, lightly floured surface, add the salt and knead the dough for about 10-minutes.

  • Use a dough scraper to release dough off of the counter when stuck and add flour when needed if the dough gets really sticky

  • I typically need to use anywhere from 1/3 to 1/2 of a cup more flour for dusting while kneading.

6. When the dough holds its shape and you are able to make a dimple and it bounces back out, the dough is ready to proof.

  • If the dimple stays indented, knead another 3-5 minutes until the dimple doesn’t stick.


7. Place the kneaded dough back into the bowl, cover with plastic wrap and set aside until doubled, another 1-4 hours for the second rise.

  • Again, be mindful of your seasonal temperature and its effect on the rise.


8. After the second rise, add dried fruit and nuts to the dough and using a folding method, incorporate the fruit, seeds and nuts until evenly mixed in.


9. Turn the dough out onto a flour dusted counter.

10. Dust a proofing basket or a large bowl lined with a clean tea towel with a generous amount of flour.


11. Place the dough into the basket or bowl, cover and let rise (third rise).

  • If you want to bake that evening: rise for 2-4 hours before baking.

  • If you want to bake tomorrow morning: set the in the refrigerator overnight.


Fruit Sourdough Bread
Ready to Rise

Nut Sourdough Bread
After third rise

12. When you are ready to bake, preheat your over to 425 degrees with a large Dutch oven inside.


13. Lay a piece of parchment onto the counter and turn the loaf out onto it so the dough floured side up.


14. Dust off any excess flour and taking a bread lame or sharp knife, slice a decoration into your dough.

15. Once the oven is heated, place the dough (with the parchment) into the Dutch oven, cover and bake for 25 minutes to allow the bread to steam.


16. Remove lid and bake another 15-20 minutes until golden brown.


17. Remove from the Dutch oven and parchment paper and cool completely on a wire rack.


18. Slice and enjoy with a generous spread of grass-fed butter!



Sourdough Fruit Bread
Ready to Bake!

Sourdough with Fruit and Nuts
Steamed loaf, ready to brown!

FAQs

Q: Can I substitute the dried fruits, nuts and seeds?

A: Of course, use a combination of your favorite add ins!


Q: Can I freeze this?

A: Yes, I would slice the loaf prior to slicing so it is easier to get out what you want.


Q: Do I have to slice the top?

A: Technically, no, however, it is desireable to add a few slices/cuts to the top or sides allowing the steam to escape while baking.


Fruit and Nut Sourdough Wheat Bread

If you like this recipe, check these out!


24-Hour No Knead Artisan Sourdough Bread: Amazing sourdough that is the perfect accompaniment to soups, salad, steaks and for sandwiches. In my opinion, all this sourdough needs is a generous pat of grass-fed butter!

Sourdough Focaccia: My family just loves this tangy and delicious sourdough focaccia bread. It comes together in less than 24-hours and is just delicious when paired with a crisp salad, bowl of soup, or as a side to your favorite dinner.


The Easiest No-Knead Crusty Bread: Looking for a quick bread that is minimal work? This bread is so simple with only four ingredients and no kneading! Just mix in the morning and you're ready to bake that afternoon!


I hope you enjoy this as much as my family does. - Amy


 

Did you make this recipe? Tag @almond.milk.and.cookies on Instagram and hashtag it #almondmilkandcookies


 

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